/New Executive Actions on Immigration: FAQs (Pt. 3)

New Executive Actions on Immigration: FAQs (Pt. 3)

Wrapping up our three-part blog series New Executive Actions on Immigration: FAQs, here are some more answers to frequently asked questions about the new executive actions on immigration.

Q – Will the initiatives associated with the new executive actions on immigration delay USCIS’ processing of other immigration applications?

While these FAQs on the new executive actions on immigration are informative, contact the Hanlon Law Group when you need help with any immigration issues.

While these FAQs on the new executive actions on immigration are informative, contact the Hanlon Law Group when you need help with any immigration issues.

A – Ideally no. However, USCIS has stated that it will be:

  • Hiring new staff to deal with the increased workload
  • The costs of these new hires will be funded through application fees collected by USCIS (rather than through appropriated funds)
  • Monitoring the workload and its capacity moving forward as these new programs get up and rolling
  • Keeping the public informed if there are substantial delays expected in the processing of any immigration cases.

Q – What kind of security checks and/or background checks are associated with the initiatives?

A – Because the initiatives associated with the new executive actions on immigration include options for deportation relief – and because USCIS is committed to maintaining the “security and integrity of the immigration system,” there will be extensive background checks conducted on all people applying for the new initiatives and programs. Specifically, these USCIS background checks will include (but are not strictly limited to):

  • Taking 10-print fingerprints of each applicant
  • Running background checks on each applicant’s primary name, as well as any aliases an applicant has ever gone by
  • Checking with any other federal government agencies regarding issues associated with an applicant.

The specific goals of running such extensive background checks on all applicants are to identify people who may:

  • Threaten national security and/or public safety
  • Have a criminal record
  • Have committed some type of fraud
  • Otherwise not be eligible to request deferred action

Q – What happens when people don’t pass the background checks?

A – A failure to pass USCIS background checks for deferred action – either due to fraud, a failure to disclose all of the necessary facts, etc. – can result in USCIS:

  • Denying the application for deferred action
  • Referring the case to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)
  • Requiring the applicant to appear before an immigration judge.

Los Angeles, California Immigration Lawyers at the Hanlon Law Group, P.C.

Do you need help with any immigration issues? If so, it’s time to contact the trusted Los Angeles immigration lawyers at the Hanlon Law Group, P.C. For more than 15 years, our attorneys have been successfully representing clients in various types of immigration cases, including those that involve the most basic immigration applications to those associated with extremely complicated federal court litigation.

To learn more about our citizenship, immigration and deportation defense services contact our Los Angeles immigration attorneys today by calling (626) 765-4641 or (866) 489-7612 or by emailing us using the form at the upper right-hand side of the screen. From our office in Pasadena, we serve clients throughout the Los Angeles area, across the state of California and from around the world.

We offer free, confidential initial consultations to provide potential clients with expert advice regarding their immigration law needs. Additionally, we are able to provide immigration legal services in various languages, including in Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Bahasa Indonesian, Tagalog and Fukienese.

2017-12-19T18:01:30+00:00 Blogs, Deportation & Removal Defense, U.S. Immigration Law, Uncategorized|Comments Off on New Executive Actions on Immigration: FAQs (Pt. 3)