/Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs (Pt. 3)

Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs (Pt. 3)

Wrapping up our three-part blog series Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs, below we will respond to some additional questions people have when they are ready to help their close relatives obtain their Green Cards.

Q – What are my obligations when I file a petition for my relative to become a U.S. permanent resident?

While these FAQs about helping a relative become a U.S. permanent resident are helpful, contact us when you are ready for professional advice regarding your important immigration matters.

While these FAQs about helping a relative become a U.S. permanent resident are helpful, contact us when you are ready for professional advice regarding your important immigration matters.

A – This is a good question because people do need to realize that, by filing a petition for a relative to become a U.S. permanent resident, they will accept certain legal obligations. Specifically, your obligation will be a financial one, and you will be required to:

  • Financially sponsor your relative.
  • File a Form I-864 with USCIS.
  • Provide all necessary supporting documentation, which may include paystubs, bank statements or other paperwork to verify your financial standing.

If you are not able to meet the financial obligations of filing these petitions for relatives, then someone else will need to be the financial sponsor of your relative.

Q – How do I file and what happens after filing?

A – The first thing to do if you are ready to move forward with a petition to help a relative become a U.S. permanent resident is to:

  • Correctly complete a Form I-130.
  • File it with USCIS, along with the essential supporting documentation (namely, proof of your relationship to the relative for whom you are applying for permanent residency).
  • Pay the necessary fees.

Once these steps have been completed, USCIS will send you a confirmation receipt by mail; if there is an problem with your petition (such as it not being signed or properly completed), this receipt will notify you of these issues so that you can resolve them and your petition can proceed.

Completed petitions will then be reviewed by USCIS officials, who will then issue a decision regarding the petition if the petition is approved; then, the case will be sent to the U.S. Department of State’s National Visa Center (NVC).

Q – What if I end up obtaining citizenship while my relative’s petition is pending?

A – If you obtain U.S. citizenship as your relative’s case is pending, this is good news for both you and your relative! This is because your new status can advance the processing of your relative’s case and help him or her obtain a visa almost immediately (as long as there is nothing barring them from getting these visas).

Communicating these changes and dealing with the USCIS can be more complicated than people may realize, however, so it’s best to have an experienced immigration attorney assist you with this so that your relatives can obtain the immigration statuses they need without unnecessary costs, delays and stress.

Los Angeles, California Immigration Lawyers at the Hanlon Law Group, P.C.

Do you or someone you love need help becoming a U.S. permanent resident? If so, don’t hesitate to contact the Los Angeles immigration attorneys at the Hanlon Law Group.

To learn more about our citizenship, immigration and deportation defense services contact our Los Angeles immigration attorneys today by calling (626) 765-4641 or (866) 489-7612 or by emailing us using the form at the upper right-hand side of the screen.

From our office in Pasadena, we serve clients throughout the Los Angeles area, across the state of California and from around the world.

2017-12-19T18:01:30+00:00 Blogs, Family Immigration, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs (Pt. 3)