/Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs (Pt. 2)

Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs (Pt. 2)

Picking up from where Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs (Pt. 1) left off, here, we will answer some more frequently asked questions about these types of immigration cases.

Q – What are the options for my relative’s family members who may also want to become a U.S. permanent resident?

When you are ready to help a relative become a U.S. permanent resident, contact us. We will provide you with superior legal services to minimize the stress of the process.

When you are ready to help a relative become a U.S. permanent resident, contact us. We will provide you with superior legal services to minimize the stress of the process.

A – The specific options available for a relative’s family members will depend on the relationship these members have with the relative who is the center of the petition you have filed, as well as these other family member’s ages.

For example, if the relative for whom you have filed a petition to become a U.S. permanent resident has an unmarried child younger than 21, this child can typically obtain an immigration status change on the same petition that his relative is using (i.e., the petition you have already filed); however, new petitions may have to be filed for married children, children older than 21 years old and other family members.

If you have questions about your options in such a case, contact the Los Angeles immigration attorneys at the Hanlon Law Group. We are ready to provide you with all of the answers you need so you can make the best moves as you proceed with your important immigration matters.

Q – How long will my relative have to wait to come to the U.S.?

A – In general, the people associated with newly filed petitions to become a U.S. permanent resident will have to wait years before they are able to legally immigrate to the U.S., as a high demand and the legal limits in place restrict the number of people whose cases are processed and who, consequently, can immigrate to America.

That being stated, however, here’s some other important info to know about immigrating to the U.S. when these petitions have been filed:

  • The U.S. Department of State will notify applicants of when they’ve reached the front of the queue and, as a result, when they are eligible to immigrate.
  • There may be some fees to pay, and making sure these have been paid before a relative immigrates will be critical to avoiding any possible complications or challenges to their entry into the U.S. (and their receipt of a Permanent Resident Card or a Green Card).

Q – Can my relative stay in the U.S. until becoming a U.S. permanent resident?

A – Unfortunately, no. The approval of your petition for your relative to become a U.S. permanent resident simply means that your relative has been approved to be placed in line for consideration and possibly granting of a visa; in other words, this approval is not the approval for a visa, which will be needed to legally immigrate to the U.S.

If your petition for your relative has already been approved and your relative is now waiting in queue for a visa, it’s best that this relative wait for approval to come to the U.S. and not come before, as immigrating without a legal status can negatively impact his application for permanent U.S. residency.

Be sure to look for the upcoming conclusion to this blog series!

Los Angeles, California Immigration Lawyers at the Hanlon Law Group, P.C.

Do you or someone you love need help becoming a U.S. permanent resident? If so, don’t hesitate to contact the Los Angeles immigration attorneys at the Hanlon Law Group.

To learn more about our citizenship, immigration and deportation defense services contact our Los Angeles immigration attorneys today by calling (626) 765-4641 or (866) 489-7612 or by emailing us using the form at the upper right-hand side of the screen.

2017-12-19T18:01:30+00:00Blogs, Family Immigration, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Helping a Relative Become a U.S. Permanent Resident: FAQs (Pt. 2)