/Federal bill could allot $165 million for immigration enforcement

Federal bill could allot $165 million for immigration enforcement

We talk about it all the time on this blog and when you read the news, the sentiment is no different — the issue of immigration is very controversial and everyone has a different opinion on how to effectively deal with the matter.

Recently, federal officials have stressed prosecutorial discretion with illegal immigrant and deportation cases. This strategy drops many cases quickly as U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement looks to prioritize its cases, focusing on people with criminal backgrounds. Prosecutorial discretion, though, is just another ripple in the ever-changing pond that is immigration law.

A $51 billion federal bill is being considered by the House and Senate to fund many Justice and Commerce Department programs. $165 million of that money could go towards cities to help their immigration enforcement programs incarcerate and investigate immigration cases — but it is not that simple.

There is an amendment to that $165 million that will cut the funding to cities that fail to enforce immigration laws, or “sanctuary cities” as they were labeled. In addition, the White House is considering vetoing the bill anyway (the immigration provision is but a small part of the financial measure) as it looks to curb spending.

While immigration enforcement might be an expensive endeavor, this bill shows that immigration laws are constantly in a state of flux and it can be very difficult for people who are being threatened with deportation to properly defend themselves because of this. That is why proper legal representation is very important – a person facing deportation needs experienced and knowledgeable counsel to defend their case in the often confusing world of immigration law.

Source: Los Angeles Times, “House OKs money for jailing illegal immigrants — with caveat,” Richard Simon, May 10, 2012

2018-03-20T17:49:57+00:00 Deportation & Removal Defense, U.S. Immigration Law|Comments Off on Federal bill could allot $165 million for immigration enforcement