/How to Avoid Immigration Scams: Top Tips from USCIS (Pt. 2) 

How to Avoid Immigration Scams: Top Tips from USCIS (Pt. 2) 

Picking up from where How to Avoid Immigration Scams: Top Tips from USCIS (Pt. 1) left off, here, we will continue discussing some essential things you should know so that you and your family don’t get tricked or hurt by an immigration scam.

How to Avoid Immigration Scams: More Filing Tips

Never signing blank immigration forms and never paying cash to people “helping” you with your case are two effective ways to avoid immigration scams.

Never signing blank immigration forms and never paying cash to people “helping” you with your case are two effective ways to avoid immigration scams.

In addition to the three tips discussed in the first part of this blog series, below are some more filing tips that can help you avoid immigration scams.

4 – Never sign blank immigration forms.

No matter what a professional tells you, signing blank immigration forms is NEVER in your best interests. In fact, if you do end up signing blank forms, you can open yourself up to scam artists, who may have the opportunity to:

  • Fill in whatever info they want on your forms
  • Steal your personal information and never submit your immigration forms.

5 – Know USCIS filing fees and accepted forms of payment.

While you can pay additional fees to expedite certain types of immigration applications and cases, in general, you should not have to pay more than the USCIS filing fees when submitting applications to the agency for review and processing. Similarly, knowing USCIS’ accepted forms of payments can help you avoid immigration scams.

In particular, be very suspicious of people or organizations that:

  • Tell you that you have to pay more than the USCIS filing fees to get your application or case submitted to USCIS.
  • Ask you for cash payments, as USCIS only accepts money orders, certified checks and credit cards for filing payments.

6 – Get receipts for payments.

For any payments you make to USCIS or professionals who may be helping you with your immigration case, make sure you always get receipts for these payments. Having receipts cannot only help you keep track of all payments you’ve made, but it can also help you prove when you may have already paid for services.

7 – Keep copies of everything.

For every form, document, photo, etc. that you submit to USCIS and/or professionals helping you with your immigration case, ALWAYS keep copies of everything. Having backup copies (either physical or electronic) can be crucial in the event that:

  • USCIS misplaces any of these things.
  • An immigration scammer throws away, manipulates or otherwise messes up immigration applications.

For some final important tips to help you avoid immigration scams, don’t miss the upcoming conclusion to this blog series!

Los Angeles, California Immigration Lawyers at the Hanlon Law Group, P.C.

At the Hanlon Law Group, P.C., our Los Angeles immigration attorneys have more than 15 years of experience successfully representing clients in various types of immigration cases, including those that involve the most basic immigration applications to those associated with extremely complicated federal court litigation.

To learn more about how we can help you with your important immigration matters, contact us today by calling (626) 765-4641 or (866) 489-7612 or by emailing us using the form at the upper right-hand side of the screen. From our office in Pasadena, we serve clients throughout the Los Angeles area, across the state of California and from around the world.

We offer free, confidential initial consultations to provide potential clients with expert advice regarding their immigration law needs. Additionally, we are able to provide immigration legal services in various languages, including in Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Bahasa Indonesian, Tagalog and Fukienese.

By |2017-12-19T18:01:30+00:00January 5th, 2015|Categories: Blogs, U.S. Citizenship, Uncategorized|Comments Off on How to Avoid Immigration Scams: Top Tips from USCIS (Pt. 2) 

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