/4 Grounds for Denaturalization & Appealing Citizenship Revocation (Pt. 2)

4 Grounds for Denaturalization & Appealing Citizenship Revocation (Pt. 2)

Continuing from 4 Grounds for Denaturalization & Appealing Citizenship Revocation (Pt. 1), below are some more possible grounds for the USCIS to initiate denaturalization proceedings against a person.

Dishonorable discharges from the military can be grounds for denaturalization. If you are facing the possibility of denaturalization, contact the Hanlon Law Group.

Dishonorable discharges from the military can be grounds for denaturalization. If you are facing the possibility of denaturalization, contact the Hanlon Law Group.

Specifically, people may be at risk of having their citizenship revoked when the USCIS (or other authorities) suspect that people have:

2. Been members of a subversive or terrorist group – As part of the process of becoming a U.S. citizen, a person has to give an oath of allegiance to the U.S. Among other things, this means that an individual cannot have been a member of any group that the U.S. government has deemed to be subversive within five years of obtaining citizenship.

If a person lies about having been a member of a subversive or terrorist group in the past or ends up joining such a group after obtaining citizenship, this can also be grounds for the USCIS to initiate denaturalization proceedings against that person.

3. Refused to comply with court-orders to testify in certain cases – If the U.S. government suspects that a person has somehow been involved with a subversive group and that individual is ordered to testify in a case based on this suspicion, that person is obligated to provide testimony if the case is proceeding within 10 years of a person having been granted citizenship. Generally, such cases will specifically involve allegations of harmful or subversive acts against any U.S. government body or government official.

Failure to comply with this by refusing to testify can be grounds for denaturalization, according to USCIS.

4. Been dishonorably discharged from the military – Serving in a branch of the U.S. military is one way for people to gain citizenship. However, a person must complete 5 years of honorable service to solidify his citizenship.

If some action has led to a person being dishonorably discharged before having served 5 years (because, for instance, that person allegedly committed a crime or went AWOL), USCIS can initiate denaturalization proceedings against that person.

Stay posted for the upcoming conclusion to this three-part blog for a closer look at what people can do to appeal denaturalization, avoid deportation and protect their citizenship.

Los Angeles, California Immigration Lawyers at the Hanlon Law Group, P.C.

At the Hanlon Law Group, P.C., our Los Angeles immigration attorneys have more than 15 years of experience successfully representing clients in various types of immigration cases, including those that involve the most basic immigration applications to those associated with extremely complicated federal court litigation. Our firm offers state-of-the art technology to deliver these services efficiently while also providing each of our clients with old-fashioned personal service.

Let’s Talk about Your Case

To learn more about our citizenship, immigration and deportation defense services contact our Los Angeles immigration attorneys today by calling (626) 765-4641 or (866) 489-7612 or by emailing us using the form at the upper right-hand side of the screen. From our office in Pasadena, we serve clients throughout the Los Angeles area, across the state of California and from around the world.

We offer free, confidential initial consultations to provide potential clients with expert advice regarding their immigration law needs. Additionally, we are able to provide immigration legal services in various languages, including in Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Bahasa Indonesian, Tagalog and Fukienese.

2018-01-30T20:06:52+00:00Blogs, Deportation & Removal Defense, U.S. Citizenship, Uncategorized|Comments Off on 4 Grounds for Denaturalization & Appealing Citizenship Revocation (Pt. 2)